Paroxetine


Paroxetine Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, and More

4.18.2018 by Alexis Johnson
Paroxetine
Paroxetine Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, and More

Paroxetine oral tablet is available in immediate-release and extended-release forms. It's also available as both a generic drug and brand-name drugs.

If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away. If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center.

For severe kidney disease.

You should be on the lowest dose that works for you. You should take this drug in one dose per day.

For severe liver disease.

You shouldn’t drive, use heavy machinery, or do other activities for which you need to be alert until you know how this drug affects you. Paroxetine oral tablet can cause drowsiness and may affect your ability to make decisions, think clearly, or react quickly.

You should avoid drinks that contain alcohol when taking this drug.

You and your doctor should monitor certain health issues.

Common Side Effects of Paxil (Paroxetine Hydrochloride) Drug

12.26.2018 by Brianna Marshman
Paroxetine
Common Side Effects of Paxil (Paroxetine Hydrochloride) Drug

Find a comprehensive guide to possible side effects including common and rare side effects when taking Paxil (Paroxetine Hydrochloride) for healthcare.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: The most commonly observed adverse events associated with the use of paroxetine (incidence of 5% or greater and incidence for PAXIL at least twice that of placebo, derived from Table 3) were: Nausea, dry mouth, decreased appetite, constipation, dizziness, somnolence, tremor, sweating, impotence, and abnormal ejaculation.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: The most commonly observed adverse events associated with the use of paroxetine (incidence of 5% or greater and incidence for PAXIL at least twice that for placebo, derived from Table 4) were: Asthenia, sweating, nausea, dry mouth, diarrhea, decreased appetite, somnolence, libido decreased, abnormal ejaculation, female genital disorders, and impotence.

Paroxetine

10.24.2018 by Brianna Marshman
Paroxetine
Paroxetine

Paroxetine, also known by trade names including Paxil and Seroxat among others, is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class.

Paroxetine is well-absorbed following oral administration. [61] It has an absolute bioavailability of about 50%, with evidence of a saturable first-pass effect. [68] When taken orally, it achieves maximum concentration in about 6–10 hours [61] and reaches steady-state in 7–14 days. [68] Paroxetine exhibits significant interindividual variations in volume of distribution and clearance. [68] Less than 2% of an oral dose is excreted in urine unchanged. [68]

Due to reports of adverse withdrawal reactions upon terminating treatment, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) at the European Medicines Agency recommends gradually reducing over several weeks or months if the decision to withdraw is made.

ParoxetineThe Antidepressant from Hell? Probably Not, But

9.23.2018 by Connor Audley
Paroxetine
ParoxetineThe Antidepressant from Hell? Probably Not, But

Paroxetine, also known by the trade names Aropax, Paxil, Pexeva, Seroxat, Sereupin and Brisdelle, was first marketed in the U.S. in 1992. Effective for major.

Between 2001 and 2006, several groups of researchers published case control studies and reviews of the antidepressants and breast cancer research. Some concluded there was no association between antidepressant use and breast cancer, while others concluded there was an association and/or that the possible link between antidepressants and breast cancer risk had not been excluded, and additional studies were needed. Further, some case-control studies found that SSRI use is more common among women who developed breast cancer, while other case-control studies found no association between SSRIs and breast cancer.

Paroxetine Uses, Dosage & Side Effects

8.22.2018 by Alexis Johnson
Paroxetine
Paroxetine Uses, Dosage & Side Effects

Paroxetine is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Paroxetine affects chemicals in the brain that may be.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to paroxetine: skin rash or hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

dry mouth, yawning; or.

Immediate-release tablets and suspension: Initial dose: 20 mg orally once a day Maintenance dose: 20 to 50 mg orally once a day Maximum dose: 50 mg orally once a day Controlled-release tablets: Initial dose: 25 mg orally once a day Maintenance dose: 25 to 62.5 mg orally once a day Maximum dose: 62.5 mg orally once a day Duration: Acute episodes of major depressive disorder require several months or longer of sustained pharmacologic therapy; systemic evaluation has shown that efficacy was maintained for up to one year.