Chlordiazepoxide for sleep


Effects of ritanserin and chlordiazepoxide on sleep-wakefulness

6.18.2018 by Matthew Allford
Chlordiazepoxide for sleep

Effects of ritanserin and chlordiazepoxide on sleep-wakefulness alterations in rats following chronic cocaine treatment. Dugovic C(1), Meert TF, Ashton D.

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Following cocaine discontinuation, the circadian distribution of sleep-wakefulness states remained disturbed in saline-treated rats for at least 5 days. Intraperitoneal (IP) injection of chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg) but not ritanserin (0.63 mg/kg) prevented the increase of wakefulness (W) and the reduction of light slow wave sleep (SWS1) and deep slow wave sleep (SWS2) induced by an acute injection of cocaine (20 mg/kg IP). For chlordiazepoxide sedative and sleep-inducing properties probably play a major role. The mechanisms by which both compounds exert their effect are probably quite different. Daily injection of cocaine (20 mg/kg for 5 days, then 30 mg/kg for 5 days IP) at the onset of the light phase elicited an increase of W and a concomitant decrease of SWS1, SWS2 and paradoxical sleep (PS) in the light phase, followed by a rebound in SWS2 and PS in the subsequent dark phase. Both ritanserin (0.63 mg/kg IP/day) and chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg IP/day) reduced the alteration in the distribution of W and SWS2 throughout the light-dark cycle from the first day of administration on, but failed to prevent PS alterations. In contrast, for ritanserin SWS2-increasing properties and its ability to reverse preference for drugs of abuse without inducing aversion might be key factors. The effects of ritanserin, a 5-hydroxytryptamine-2 (5-HT2) receptor antagonist, and chlordiazepoxide, a benzodiazepine agonist, on sleep-wakefulness disturbances in rats after acute administration of cocaine and after discontinuation of chronic cocaine treatment were examined.

Differential EEG effects of the anxiolytic drugs, deramciclane (EGIS

5.17.2018 by Alexis Johnson
Chlordiazepoxide for sleep

Both deramciclane and ritanserin slightly increased total time spent in deep sleep (DS) and lengthened sleep episodes. In contrast, chlordiazepoxide had a.

Following drug administration (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg, PO for all drugs), EEG was continuously sampled for 6 h and power spectra were calculated for every 5 s to assess changes in slow wave activity and sleep phases. In contrast, chlordiazepoxide had a strong inhibitory action on DS, sleep time being shifted to more superficial light sleep (LS). In mice, chlordiazepoxide had a marked anticonvulsant effect, while deramciclane was moderay effective and ritanserin ineffective. The influence of serotonergic and benzodiazepine type anxiolytic drugs on the cortical activation and sleep-wakefulness cycle were compared by evaluating the effects of ritanserin and deramciclane (EGIS-3886), two 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, and chlordiazepoxide on the electroencephalogram (EEG) in freely moving rats. The incidence and length of the high voltage spindle (HVS) episodes characteristic for the motionless, awake rat were increased at the highest dose of both deramciclane and ritanserin, while it was decreased by chlordiazepoxide. In conclusion, the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist anxiolytic drugs seem to be superior compared to the benzodiazepine type anxiolytic drug, chlordiazepoxide, as ritanserin and deramciclane improved sleep quality by increasing sleep episode length and time spent in DS, while chlordiazepoxide enhanced sleep fragmentation and decreased DS. Both deramciclane and ritanserin slightly increased total time spent in deep sleep (DS) and lengthened sleep episodes. In a separate test, anticonvulsant effects of the drugs were examined in mice.

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National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

The effects of long term administration of psychotropic drugs on

3.15.2018 by Brianna Marshman
Chlordiazepoxide for sleep

The effects on laboratory sleep, home sleep, and mood were Chlordiazepoxide Benzodiazepines Tranquilizers Sleep Desynchronized.

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Advertisement. This work was supported in part by National Institute of Mental Health Grant # MH 14520.

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September 1973, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 233–245| Cite as.

Slow-wave sleep (stages 3 and 4) was normal for the first few days, but then showed a great decrease and remained significantly low throughout the period of drug administration, and for the first week after discontinuation. During the period when both slow-wave sleep and D-time are decreased, stage 2 sleep is greatly increased. CDX produced an immediate increase in sleep time, but this returned to placebo levels after 2–3 days. CDX produced little effect on mood; subjective “quality of sleep” was judged better on CDX than on placebo by these subjects. D-time similarly is not greatly affected for the first days, but is then decreased for the remainder of the four weeks on medication.

This paper reports on the effects of long-term administration of chlordiazepoxide (CDX) (50 mg per day at bedtime) on normal young males. The effects on laboratory sleep, home sleep, and mood were investigated.

Effects of chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride on discrimination

10.22.2018 by Connor Audley
Chlordiazepoxide for sleep

During chronic treatment with chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride, sleeping time was significantly reduced on the 1st day of drug administration, and increased on.

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The results are discussed in terms of a “disinhibition effect” following acute administration of chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride, with possible changes in metabolism or accumulation of metabolites occurring during chronic administration of the drug.

Socs exp. (1969) 28: 338. An abstract appeared in Fedn Proc. A preliminary report was presented to the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Atlantic City, New Jersey, on 15 April 1969. Fedn Am. Biol.

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Two series of tests were conducted on freely moving cats with chronically implanted electrodes. Chlorpromazine (5 mg/kg p.o.) reduced response to the rewarded signal; phenobarbital (40 mg/kg p.o.) had no effect. In a conditioned discrimination experiment, chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride (10 mg/kg p.o.) significantly increased response to the non-rewarded but not to the rewarded signal. Its frequency was increased by chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride but not by the other drugs. The electrocorticogram was transmitted by emetry during these trials.

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Sleep tests were made with a 6-hr observation period. During chronic treatment with chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride, sleeping time was significantly reduced on the 1st day of drug administration, and increased on the 2nd and 4th days. During acute treatment with the drugs and doses listed above, cats spent less time asleep after chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride than after chlorpromazine or phenobarbital.

Differential EEG effects of the anxiolytic drugs, deramciclane (EGIS

9.21.2018 by Alexis Johnson
Chlordiazepoxide for sleep

Both deramciclane and ritanserin slightly increased total time spent in deep sleep (DS) and lengthened sleep episodes. In contrast, chlordiazepoxide had a.

March 1999, Volume 142, Issue 3, pp 318–326| Cite as.

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Received: 1 July 1998/Final version: 4 September 1998 Advertisement.

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In conclusion, the 5-HT 2 receptor antagonist anxiolytic drugs seem to be superior compared to the benzodiazepine type anxiolytic drug, chlordiazepoxide, as ritanserin and deramciclane improved sleep quality by increasing sleep episode length and time spent in DS, while chlordiazepoxide enhanced sleep fragmentation and decreased DS. In mice, chlordiazepoxide had a marked anticonvulsant effect, while deramciclane was moderay effective and ritanserin ineffective. The influence of serotonergic and benzodiazepine type anxiolytic drugs on the cortical activation and sleep-wakefulness cycle were compared by evaluating the effects of ritanserin and deramciclane (EGIS-3886), two 5-HT 2 receptor antagonists, and chlordiazepoxide on the electroencephalogram (EEG) in freely moving rats. The incidence and length of the high voltage spindle (HVS) episodes characteristic for the motionless, awake rat were increased at the highest dose of both deramciclane and ritanserin, while it was decreased by chlordiazepoxide. In a separate test, anticonvulsant effects of the drugs were examined in mice. Following drug administration (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg, PO for all drugs), EEG was continuously sampled for 6 h and power spectra were calculated for every 5 s to assess changes in slow wave activity and sleep phases. Both deramciclane and ritanserin slightly increased total time spent in deep sleep (DS) and lengthened sleep episodes. In contrast, chlordiazepoxide had a strong inhibitory action on DS, sleep time being shifted to more superficial light sleep (LS).